Archive for the ‘The Army’ Category

The End

Posted: July 31, 2016 in The Army

This was originally posted on Facebook on January 7, 2015 but failed to make its way here.

1,512 days, 5 states, and 6 countries later, after 2 missed Christmases, 5 missed Thanksgivings, and countless other missed holidays, weddings, birthdays, and events, I drive off of Fort Hood as a Soldier for the last time today and in to the civilian world to start the next chapter of my life like Andy Dufresne leaving Shawshank. To all of my family, close friends, and Army comrades — there are too many of you to name or count but you know who you are — I cannot thank you enough for all of the support in every way possible over the past 4 years, I wouldn’t have made it without each and every one of you. And just like that, my service in the United States Army was over. #‎CantPlayPingPongNoMore‬ #‎SoIWentHome‬

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Tying Up Loose Ends

Posted: July 14, 2014 in Egypt, Israel, The Army, The Blog
I'm just using this blog post as an excuse to include this picture because it falsely depicts me as a bad ass but its a reputation I hope proliferates via word of mouth.

I’m just using this blog post as an excuse to include this picture because it falsely depicts me as a bad ass but it’s a reputation I hope spreads like wild fire.

It has been an extremely busy two months but I am happy to say that I am back Stateside for the foreseeable future.  Now that the dust of our triumphant return from Egypt has settled, I have decided to quit being lazy and try to tie up a few loose ends from my time overseas.  The next few posts in the coming days/weeks/whenever I feel like it will include my trips to Jerusalem and Kuwait City, as well as a final word on my time in Egypt and at the Red Sea.  Why I didn’t use my down time while deployed to post these updates will remain a mystery to both you and me but better late than never.

Am I right or am I right?

Acts of Kindness

Posted: April 18, 2014 in Egypt, Life, The Army

As I sit in my room, taking yet another break from the packing process that marks the final few weeks of my time in the Sinai, I am able to reflect on the past eight months here in Egypt.  More importantly, as I thumb through the countless letters, cards, gifts, and words of encouragement — most of which are from perfect strangers — I am once again overcome with a sense of astonishment at the kindness of average people, most of whom I do not even personally know.  And I mean absolutely no insult by the phrase “average people.”  In fact, it is just the opposite; incredible people committing extraordinary acts of kindness.  I only use the term “average” in that I have come to the realization that these folks are the rule not the exception.  The only reason such acts seem so uncommon is that those instances simply do not get the recognition deserved.

If you are friends with me on Facebook then you have likely already seen me post on several occasions the care packages or gifts I have received from individuals, organizations, and sports teams leading up to, and throughout, the holidays and beyond.  It all started back in the fall when I was looking for a copy of Jurassic Park and dropped a line to a group known as Books For Soldiers.  This nonprofit was organized during the original Gulf War to provide free, new or gently used books upon request for service members overseas.  After submitting my address, I thought nothing more about the book until a copy of Jurassic Park arrived in the mail a few weeks later with a personalized letter.

From Facebook on October 4, 2013:  Jurassic Park was the first adult novel I ever read back in 5th grade, it was the only book we had in Basic Training when another Soldier snuck it in to the barracks and we passed it around in the evenings to cure boredom, and it's generally one of my favorite books. I've been wanting to read it again just for kicks but couldn't find a copy around here. I randomly stumbled across www.BooksForSoldiers.com the other day and submitted a request for Jurassic Park in paperback, not thinking anymore about it. That was about two weeks ago. Yesterday, a small care package arrived from the Friends of the Hickory Corner Library (East Windsor, NJ) with the book, along with a personal letter thanking me for my service. In reality, I'm the one who should be thanking the person who took the time to acquire, package, and send a book to someone they've never even met. A random act of kindness that really made my day. So while the jackasses in Washington fight like children and play games with many Americans' livelihoods, it's nice to be reminded that there are still good and decent people in this world that just try to make someone else's day just a little bit brighter.

From Facebook on October 4, 2013:  “Jurassic Park was the first adult novel I ever read back in 5th grade, it was the only book we had in Basic Training when another Soldier snuck it in to the barracks and we passed it around in the evenings to cure boredom, and it’s generally one of my favorite books. I’ve been wanting to read it again just for kicks but couldn’t find a copy around here. I randomly stumbled across http://www.BooksForSoldiers.com the other day and submitted a request for Jurassic Park in paperback, not thinking anymore about it. That was about two weeks ago. Yesterday, a small care package arrived from the Friends of the Hickory Corner Library (East Windsor, NJ) with the book, along with a personal letter thanking me for my service. In reality, I’m the one who should be thanking the person who took the time to acquire, package, and send a book to someone they’ve never even met. A random act of kindness that really made my day. So while the jackasses in Washington fight like children and play games with many Americans’ livelihoods, it’s nice to be reminded that there are still good and decent people in this world that just try to make someone else’s day just a little bit brighter.”

As you can tell, I was a bit surprised and even more flattered by the fact that someone I had never met took the time to do something of this nature for me.  Obviously I understand that this is what the organization does, but that fact did not make it any less of a breath of fresh air.

I had seen a number of similar support groups online for deployed service members to that point, but a combination of the skepticism of the legitimacy of any potentially random website, the apprehension of divulging complete personal information to a web form, or just a general feeling of a lack of claim to any “freebies” because I was not deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan had all previously led me to dismiss any such organizations.  And wrongfully so.

After the success with Books For Soldiers I decided to submit my information to a wide array of groups, having a little fun with the process around the holidays, and I was not disappointed.  Since October, I have heard back from a number of charitable organizations, each of which sent more than one care package, including Bunkers In Baghdad, Operation Support Our Troops – America, and Treat The Troops, as well as companies such as Zippo, the Cincinnati Reds, and WWE, all of which sent free merchandise to pass out to my guys at Christmas.

And then I heard back from the Cincinnati Bengals, who sent the following:

From Facebook on December 13, 2013:  "A few of us in my barracks building decided to put posters on our doors of our favorite teams for the NFL season and I started it out with the standard-sized Cincinnati Bengals 2013 schedule poster (not pictured). Amid the boredom of the daily grind out here, I decided to e-mail the Bengals and see if they'd be willing to send anything they had to help my cause since what started as a harmless poster on my door had now become a bit of a team spirit competition among a few of us. To my surprise the Bengals not only responded to my e-mail but also told me that a package was on its way. I was only expecting some left over promotional items, outdated game programs, or expiring team calendars, just something to look forward to getting in the mail. What I received on Thursday went well beyond even my highest expectations. The Cincinnati Bengals sent me a 6 foot by 30 foot canvas banner that one would assume hung somewhere in Paul Brown Stadium during the military appreciation home games of November. The banner reads "SALUTE TO SERVICE --MILITARY APPRECIATION--" and is flanked by the Bengals' and NFL's logos. The fact that someone within the Bengals franchise read my e-mail and saw to it that this massive banner made it successfully out to the Sinai is awesome and it's easily one of the coolest things any company or organization could have sent me. I'm sure they get plenty of requests on a weekly basis so they didn't even have to respond to my e-mail, let alone send me what they did. Kudos to the Bengals for an extremely cool act that many in my building were impressed with, myself included. I'm a die-hard Bengals fan and while I've been a life-long fan of the team I've also been one of their biggest critics for actions both on and off the field. They're not always perfect but this classy gesture only further solidifies my loyalty to the team and makes me proud to be a fan of the Cincinnati Bengals."

From Facebook on December 13, 2013: “A few of us in my barracks building decided to put posters on our doors of our favorite teams for the NFL season and I started it out with the standard-sized Cincinnati Bengals 2013 schedule poster (not pictured). Amid the boredom of the daily grind out here, I decided to e-mail the Bengals and see if they’d be willing to send anything they had to help my cause since what started as a harmless poster on my door had now become a bit of a team spirit competition among a few of us. To my surprise the Bengals not only responded to my e-mail but also told me that a package was on its way. I was only expecting some left over promotional items, outdated game programs, or expiring team calendars, just something to look forward to getting in the mail. What I received on Thursday went well beyond even my highest expectations. The Cincinnati Bengals sent me a 6 foot by 30 foot canvas banner that one would assume hung somewhere in Paul Brown Stadium during the military appreciation home games of November. The banner reads “SALUTE TO SERVICE –MILITARY APPRECIATION–” and is flanked by the Bengals’ and NFL’s logos. The fact that someone within the Bengals franchise read my e-mail and saw to it that this massive banner made it successfully out to the Sinai is awesome and it’s easily one of the coolest things any company or organization could have sent me. I’m sure they get plenty of requests on a weekly basis so they didn’t even have to respond to my e-mail, let alone send me what they did. Kudos to the Bengals for an extremely cool act that many in my building were impressed with, myself included. I’m a die-hard Bengals fan and while I’ve been a life-long fan of the team I’ve also been one of their biggest critics for actions both on and off the field. They’re not always perfect but this classy gesture only further solidifies my loyalty to the team and makes me proud to be a fan of the Cincinnati Bengals.”

The original idea was to have a little fun and cure a little boredom during the winter grind and the response was not only unexpected, it was down right humbling.  Bunkers In Baghdad sent multiple boxes of golf clubs, golf balls, and golf memorabilia; Operation Support Our Troops – America sent several boxes containing snacks and toiletries; and Treat The Troops sent an assortment of cookies, candy, and comfort items on four separate occasions via the Iowa Cookie Crumbs and the Council Bluffs Centennial Rotary Club, both of Council Bluffs, Iowa.  My Platoon and I even received care packages and hand-made cards and letters from the students of Imagine Clay Avenue Elementary School in Toledo, Ohio, the National Junior Honor Society of Falling Creek Middle School in Chesterfield, Virginia, and the congregation of God’s Grace Church in Campbellsville, Kentucky.

A few holiday care packages.

A few holiday care packages.

I never like to be too far from a golf club, even if I live in one giant bunker.

I never like to be too far from a golf club, even if I live in one giant bunker.

Don't worry, Mom, I don't smoke.

Don’t worry, Mom, I don’t smoke.

The WWE has a long-standing reputation of supporting the Troops and as a childhood fan they didn't let me down.

The WWE has a long-standing reputation of supporting the Troops and as a childhood fan they didn’t let me down.

Seeing return addresses from the Cincinnati Bengals and the Cincinnati Reds never gets old.

Seeing return addresses from the Cincinnati Bengals and the Cincinnati Reds never gets old.

As you can see I was more than spoiled but don’t worry, all of the items were shared with the guys.

From Facebook on February 18, 2014:

I continue to be amazed by, and grateful for, the generosity of perfect strangers. Once again, I dropped my name in to a virtual hat and shortly thereafter received an incredible care package for my efforts from people I have never met. This time the culprits were the fine folks of Treat The Troops via the Rotary Club and other thoughtful residents of Council Bluffs, Iowa. I had since forgotten about adding my name to their mailing list so when a box full of cookies, candy, and words of encouragement showed up in today’s mail run I was that much more surprised and appreciative. These gestures maintain my faith in humanity and prove there is a lot of good left in America regardless of what the news will have you believe. As cliché as it sounds, it is the little things in life that can have the biggest impact on someone’s day, as I can attest to with this afternoon’s care package. You may never know what someone is going through but just the slightest act of kindness could be the difference so pay it forward and do something nice for someone today.”

These sentiments ring true now more than ever and I do not believe all of the aforementioned organizations, companies, schools, and people fully understand how much their unconditional support means to me.  This experience has truly renewed my faith in many facets of life.

Not to be outdone, however, are my close friends and my family — my rock and my foundation.  The support and encouragement (and letters, and cards, and packages, and gifts) from those who matter most to me continue to be what drives me each day.  There are too many individuals to name for fear of leaving someone out but they know who they are and I hope they know how much they, and their unconditional love and loyalty, means to me every morning I wake up.

A quote that I recently discovered that has stuck with me throughout this deployment, and I feel is only fitting in this instance, comes from Robert Kennedy, “The purpose of life is to contribute in some way to making things better.”   No matter how big or small, any positive contribution goes a long way in making things better and can have a lasting impact far greater than one might imagine, as evident by the outpouring of support mentioned above.  And while the media is chock full of negativity and the 24-hour news networks will find ways to further divide our country just to earn a dollar, it is refreshing to see people put their differences aside and simply support one another as Americans and as human beings.  Once again I say that you may never know what someone is going through on any given day so before passing judgement understand that just the slightest act of kindness could be the positive difference that person needs.

So pay it forward and do something nice for someone today.

Have no fear, folks, this was taken at Fort Hood sometime last year so I'm neither currently in harm's way OR in charge of anything of significance with mission success on the line.

Have no fear, folks, this was taken at Fort Hood sometime last year so I’m neither currently in harm’s way OR in charge of anything of significance with mission success on the line.

Sunday, November 17, 2013 will mark my three year anniversary with the Army.  It is crazy to think that it has already been three years since I was rudely awaken shortly after pulling in to Fort Leonard Wood in the wee hours of the morning on the 18th of November.  Apparently crossing your arms and catching a little shut-eye before the biggest undertaking of your life is frowned upon by Drill Sergeants with a chip on their shoulder.  He tried to explain to me, in so many words, that I was not in charge of anything; to which I felt like responding that fact was precisely why I joined the Army in the first place, but I figured it best to pick and choose my battles on Day Zero of Week Zero.  Based on the Drill Sergeant’s absence of tact I figured my reasonable explanation was not going to be well-received.

Since then, life with the Army has not always been a perfect relationship and like all others we have had our ups, our downs, and our differences.  But in spite of it all we have found a way to make it work for a number of reasons, not the least of which is that I am contractually and legally obligated to show up every morning with a clean shave and a smile.  To mark the occasion, the Army will award me with the Good Conduct Medal for behavior so becoming they saw fit to celebrate it.  In other words, I avoided getting arrested for 1,095 consecutive days while gainfully employed by the government.

If you would have asked me back in the summer of 2010 why I wanted to join the Army the list would have looked something like this:

  1. Serve my country
  2. Pay off my student loans
  3. Open a number of doors to future job prospects
  4. See the world

The first three objectives will have largely taken care of themselves over the course of my career by virtue of enlisting, but seeing the world was set to be a completely different prospect.  Considering within that list I have the least amount of control over where I go, it has taken a bit of good fortune and opportune timing for me to travel as much as I have in such a short amount of time.  Need I remind you that prior to joining the Army I had never been west of the Mississippi River, let alone out of the country.

Since signing my name on that proverbial dotted line, I have become somewhat of an international man with substantial time spent in both South Korea and Egypt, along with very brief layovers in Germany and Japan.  I am also holding out hope for a visit to Israel in the very near future but more on that at a later time.  Even within the good ol’ U-S-of-A I have had the chance to see new and faraway lands with stays in Missouri, Georgia, and Texas, as well as a month-long stop in the shitty part of California — it counts, regardless of what you Bay-area hippies tell me.

Along the way, I have been in 15 different airports for more flights than I am able to count and I have had the pleasure of serving alongside members of 10 different national contingents.  I have played golf in two different foreign countries and have been to several historically significant areas as wide ranging as the Demilitarized Zone, the Alamo, and the Red Sea.

And as enriching and valuable as all of those experiences have been, there is one positive byproduct to joining the Army I naively left off of my list some three years ago that trumps all of the rest, outside of serving my country: the relationships I have forged and the fine folks I have come across throughout my time so far.

I am incredibly lucky to have gotten to know several great people at each of my stops in the Army.  I have had outstanding first-line supervisors, excellent mentors, and made friends with a handful people that I can quite easily file in the “life-long” category (you know who you are, especially if you are reading this blog).   The relationships with all of these people are benefits I never would have fully expected prior to signing up.

The military has a funny way of bringing people together that would not have otherwise crossed paths.  Through bridging those cultural and geographical gaps by putting all of us in the same room and in the same uniform and telling us to work it out, I have become friends with people I would not have normally given myself the chance to get to know simply based upon our perceived differences — stereotypes are a bitch.  The Army does a good job at leveling the playing field by stripping away those socioeconomic assumptions allowing individuals to get to know one another just as people, a learning experience that I am a much better man for having had.

And beyond all of this, and equally as important, I have been able to further recognize, appreciate, and strengthen the relationships with my family members and close friends from back home over the same time period despite the many challenges presented.  The importance of those friends and relatives who know you outside of your military persona and support you regardless cannot be understated, especially when you are away from home for long periods of time.  You learn to not take any of these people for granted and through the mutual sacrifice you see the loyalty and dedication of those who matter most.  Yet another blessing in disguise in the truest form.

While it has gone fast, the first three years of my time in the Army has not always been easy.  The Army will never tell you that any of it will be a cake walk but it could have been a whole lot tougher so I have few complaints. Sure, there have been some long days, a few long nights, a handful of cold showers and even long periods without one, but that IS the Army.  There have also been many missed holidays, birthdays, weddings, and parties since November of 2010, and I am positive there will be even more time away from friends and family before this wild adventure is over, but all of that is a part of the sacrifice I knowingly made when I signed up.  And without signing up I never would have had so many amazing experiences or been positively impacted by so many awesome people along the way.

The road from this point forward will not likely be any easier than the one I took to get here, and I will probably be ready to move on to the next chapter of my life when that time has come, but to say that I have been blessed so far is an understatement.